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Screening and Prevention Reduce Incidence of Colorectal Cancer

Screening and Prevention Reduce Incidence of Colorectal Cancer
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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released its new report on colorectal cancer today, which included findings that the rates of new cases and deaths from the #2 cause of cancer deaths are decreasing and more adults are being screened.

The report, Vital Signs: Colorectal Cancer Screening, Incidence, and Mortality – United States, 2002–2010 , provides current data on colorectal cancer screening, incidence, and mortality among Americans. The study used 2002–2010 data from the state-level Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to determine the number of people aged 50–75 years who were screened for colorectal cancer.

Colorectal cancer screening has increased from 52 percent in 2002 to 65 percent in 2010, but even with that increase preventative medical care is still lacking. However, if the U.S. stays on its current trajectory for screening, it will meet its Healthy People 2020 target of 70.5 percent.

For most people, the lifetime risk for developing colon cancer is about six percent, but the risk is more pronounced for those with hereditary colon cancer syndromes. Cancer screening should begin at age 50. Regular fecal testing or periodic (every 5 to 10 years) sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy (virtual or standard) is recommended.

According to the CDC, screening can find precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. Screening can also find colorectal cancer early when it is easiest to treat.

 

Report Findings on Page 2

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