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Study Links Religious Services to Optimism

SUMMARY: Regular attendance at religious services is associated with a more optimistic outlook and a lesser inclination to be depressed, compared to those who do not attend services at all.
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CHICAGO (Reuters) - Regular attendance at religious services is associated with a more optimistic outlook and a lesser inclination to be depressed, compared to those who do not attend services at all, a study concluded on Thursday.

The study's findings supports previous research that religious participation can promote psychological and physical health—and reduce mortality risks—possibly by calming people in stressful times, creating meaningful social interactions and helping curtail bad habits.

Those who said they attended services more than once a week in the previous month were 56 percent more likely to be above the median score in a measure of optimism than those who did not attend services, according to the study published in the Journal of Religion and Health.

And those who reported attending services weekly were 22 percent less likely to be depressed or have depressive symptoms compared to non-attenders.

But a researcher on the study cautioned against people assuming that adopting a religion and heading off to a church, synagogue, temple or mosque would brighten their lives.

"There is a correlation, but that does not mean there is causality," said Eliezer Schnall, an associate professor of clinical psychology at Yeshiva University in New York. "One could argue people who are more optimistic may be drawn to religious services.

"The person who says, 'I guess if I go to services, that will make me more optimistic'—while a possibility, that may not be true," he said.

Another caveat Schnall offered was that the study examined older women, so the benefits of religious activity may not apply to younger people or to males. Older women in particular have been shown in past research to engage in more social interaction at services, and to gain the most from it.

Religion Also Reduces Risk of Death - Page 2

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